A course of action

tall tree
Photo by Tom Fisk on Pexels.com

A course of action.  If you wish to help the earth, you might do the following:  Listen to a tree – or talk to a tree. If there is not tree immediately available, it could be a cloud, a rock, a bird – any aspect of the world of nature. Spend half an hour a day – or five minutes – or whatever time you have.

How will this help the earth? This will work because the basic problem which is destroying the planet we live on – is the alienation of us, as human beings, from the world of nature. Because we focus on our human interests and wishes (and sometimes genuine urgent situations that cannot be avoided), we have become alienated from nature. (When there is a real crisis that requires your attention, then come back to focusing on the tree whenever you are able to.)

In this way we will be getting back in contact with nature – and in our own way building a little bridge to connect with nature. This may be the most effective and most direct way to transform our relationship as human beings with the planet earth. And in so doing, we will be laying the groundwork for the transformation that is required. It will also have a healing effect on us – and on the tree too. And on those around us – like a pebble that lands on the water of a lake and ripples in all directions. Like the butterfly that you may have heard about who changed the course of world history by a single motion of his wings.

***

© Copyright Sharon St Joan, 2022

Orchidelirium Anew — Organikos

Burnt tip orchids. At least 10 vanished from a national nature reserve at Mount Caburn, East Sussex. Photograph: Katewarn Images/Alamy Susan Orlean brought orchidelirium to our attention in 1999, shining a light on how and why these flowers inspire lots of good, and plenty of bad behavior. Orchids have been abundant in our pages over the […]

Orchidelirium Anew — Organikos

Yes America we do have WILD horses, but not likely for much longer — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

By Stacie-Lee Sherwood “Millions of people live on the East Coast but have no idea our wild horses exist and how they need urgent help to survive…” Growing up on the east coast I knew we had horses, lots and lots of horses. None of these were wild free roaming, but they were everywhere. We […]

Yes America we do have WILD horses, but not likely for much longer — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

Mists of stone

Mists of stone

Clear in the arc of light,

Artic light, enduring

Mystery

Through the dark,

Years of dark.

Buried, the lost bones

Of history,

Dark,

Along with the ghostly groans

Of the dragon.

A snow

Flake falls.

The wind calls,

Yet

The stones live on

And remember

The heart

Of the earth,

The cart-

Wheel tracks that run their way

Into the sea,

Of Malta, gray.

The walking before dawn

In the majestic winter

When the ice floe

Shimmered under

The dancing fairies of the moon,

To find the sacred stones

Of the path that went along, some time ago.

Now lost in the delirium

Of the modern world,

Gone

Awry from the start,

Let it leave soon,

Quickly

To betray

The song of the mountain roses

That the stones may rise to an echoing drum.

Stones of mist,

Quiet

The whispering fir trees of the forest,

The breath of God in the air, curled

In the smoke of the lost fires.

The eon closes.

From the eternity of being

There arises

The swan who sails softly

In long, snow-

Winged flight,

Over the hills

In the wild mists of dawn,

Spires,

Free at last in the lost rain that spills

Through the mist

Of the singing mountains.

Dragons awake

To drifting skies.

*****

© Copyright Sharon St Joan, 2022, text and photo

Micro-Season: “Bamboo Shoots Appear” — Naturalist Weekly

We have entered the micro-season of “Bamboo Shoots Appear”. This is the third micro-season of the mini-season of First Summer. To honor this season, we are learning all about Bamboo and reading haiku by Basho, Issa, and Buson.

Micro-Season: “Bamboo Shoots Appear” — Naturalist Weekly

Springtime at the Northern California Sanctuary — Iseum Sanctuary

As the weather grows a little warmer and there is more light during the day, the population of birds swell and their sounds echo throughout our Northern California Sanctuary. With the coming of Spring there is a proliferation of bird species of all types, ranging from blue jays to robins, hawks to owls, ducks to […]

Springtime at the Northern California Sanctuary — Iseum Sanctuary

Blooming Joshuas~ —

This is the first time I have ever seen Joshua Trees in bloom! These trees were recently designated an endangered species by The California Fish & Game Commission. They are vulnerable because they exist in a limited area in The Southwestern US and Baja California. Their range is mostly contained by the boundaries of the […]

Blooming Joshuas~ —

The Living Earth – Ancient Perspectives

As part of the Amazing Earthfest, taking place all this week, Forest Voices of India will present The Living Earth: Ancient Perspectives.

Here is the link to read about, and register for, the one hour long Zoom presentation this Friday, May 13th 6 pm, U.S. Mountain time.

https://amazingearthfest.org/events/the-living-earth-ancient-perspectives

Fifty minutes of this presentation is a movie which features Dr. Nanditha Krishna, well-known authority on the culture of India and the world of nature. Also featured are Josh Nunez telling Native American stories, Musuni Letura from Kenya, and Chris Gorzalski with the Great Old Broads for Wilderness. The speakers offer views of the earth as a living being — with humans belonging to nature, rather than dominating nature. There are beautiful musical interludes by Bobbi Cheney, along with scenes of nature.

Following the movie, there will be a short time for live questions and discussion.

Registration is free. To register, click on the link above!