Dam demolitions set for Klamath River in Western U.S. will be biggest in history  — Natural History Wanderings

NPR reported on November 17 U.S. regulators approved a plan Thursday to demolish four dams on a California river and open up hundreds of miles of salmon habitat that would be the largest dam removal and river restoration project in the world when it goes forward. Read more at  Dam demolitions set for Klamath River in […]

Dam demolitions set for Klamath River in Western U.S. will be biggest in history  — Natural History Wanderings

When the raven danced

black bird on green grass
Photo by Daniil Komov on Pexels.com

On the tilting edge of the moon

The raven danced

To herald the coming

Of a newer, spirit-misted world.

Black – so many of the days

Of yesteryear,

Caught in a curled tailspin

Of swirling dust,

Yet, within the eye

Of the innocent deer,

Who stands at the border of the forest

Her toes of moonlight

Dipped in the stream

Of whirling

Shadows,

There, the ancient fire glows.

Soon,

Not far away,

The spry

Young dragon

Who chanced by –

Timid – gathers

His courage

And leaps into the fray

To play

With his lively brother.

Old deep songs in the fall-enchanted hills

Portray

A distant memory,

A clatter of bones,

Round and round the strings

Of former days

Strung together

Like ringed stones

That still

Sing

Among the dark, foreboding, rocky pillars

Of the night.

Always

Born anew,

The recurring

Blessing —

Of the bird-lit house of flowers

Perched on the tall hill –

Glimmers by the footsteps

Of the last fairy

Dancing

By the fish-finned

Stream,

In the raindrops

Of glistening showers,

Fallen from the silver mountain,

Bright

In the sacred sun,

Where the raven dreams

And dances

In the final, awakening days

Of prophecy,

In the cold wind.

Copyright Sharon St Joan 2022

Kissing Cousins~ —

Beautiful Maui, has beautiful critters. (Red Crested Cardinal) Did you know? (Spotted Dove) Birds are close relatives, (Myna Bird) to turtles? I certainly didn’t know, and neither does this baby myna! Turtles seem to know everything, (Green Sea Turtle) so this friendly guy, who swam right up to me, probably wouldn’t be surprised. Green Sea […]

Kissing Cousins~ —

Two fruit bat friends — Forest Voices of India

A Great Indian fruit bat in the wild Over two years ago, in April of 2020, two Giant Indian Fruit Bats were rescued from Bangaluru City, in south India, and brought to the WRRC (Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Centre). Both are males that weighed 390 grams and 410 grams (nearly one pound each). The Covid…

Two fruit bat friends — Forest Voices of India

Conservationists hail scientists’ western rewilding blueprint as “a major call to action” to the Biden administration —

EarthJustice News Release Conservationists today hailed a new scientific study that identifies an ambitious network of protected areas, with wolf and beaver restoration as a centerpiece, as a sound strategy for restoring native ecosystems and wildlife diversity on western public lands. The benefits of this proposal would contribute significantly to stream restoration and help mitigate […]

Conservationists hail scientists’ western rewilding blueprint as “a major call to action” to the Biden administration —

A course of action

tall tree
Photo by Tom Fisk on Pexels.com

A course of action.  If you wish to help the earth, you might do the following:  Listen to a tree – or talk to a tree. If there is not tree immediately available, it could be a cloud, a rock, a bird – any aspect of the world of nature. Spend half an hour a day – or five minutes – or whatever time you have.

How will this help the earth? This will work because the basic problem which is destroying the planet we live on – is the alienation of us, as human beings, from the world of nature. Because we focus on our human interests and wishes (and sometimes genuine urgent situations that cannot be avoided), we have become alienated from nature. (When there is a real crisis that requires your attention, then come back to focusing on the tree whenever you are able to.)

In this way we will be getting back in contact with nature – and in our own way building a little bridge to connect with nature. This may be the most effective and most direct way to transform our relationship as human beings with the planet earth. And in so doing, we will be laying the groundwork for the transformation that is required. It will also have a healing effect on us – and on the tree too. And on those around us – like a pebble that lands on the water of a lake and ripples in all directions. Like the butterfly that you may have heard about who changed the course of world history by a single motion of his wings.

***

© Copyright Sharon St Joan, 2022

New World Rewilding — Organikos

Mexican gray wolves have been reintroduced to Arizona and New Mexico over the last two decades. JIM CLARK / U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE We have been posting about rewilding for nearly a decade, and it sees fair to say that the idea has developed traction worldwide: T0GFFN Bison or Bufalo within prairie and pasture […]

New World Rewilding — Organikos

Dinosaurs survived one extinction in chilly temperatures – study — The Extinction Chronicles

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF – Saturday React8 Comments|39 Share https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/dinosaurs-survived-one-extinction-in-chilly-temperatures-study/ar-AAZ89sU?ocid=msedgdhp&cvid=b49af7fe99b848b3a537fe3c7a9b030a Save Dinosaurs may have outsurvived other creatures living alongside them during a largescale extinction preceding the period where they became dominant due to their ability to survive in frosty conditions, according to a new peer-reviewed study published in Science Advances on Friday. © (photo credit: Courtesy of Woodruff […]

Dinosaurs survived one extinction in chilly temperatures – study — The Extinction Chronicles

Stories of Noah and the Great Flood

birds flying over rough sea
Photo by Tyler Shores on Pexels.com

Frank Joseph, in his fascinating book, Survivors of Atlantis, writes about many stories from tribal sources all over North America, that describe a version of the story of Noah and the Great Flood.

An Iroquois version talks about a land in the far east where an entire people lived. All of them drowned except for one lone survivor who escaped by leaving in a large boat along with many animals. After many days lost at sea, he sent out a dove, who returned from the west with a willow branch in his beak. Every year, the Iroquois featured the dove in a spring festival – which took place when the willow bloomed.

A similar ceremony was held by the Sioux, Chickasaw, Pima, Okanogan, and Mandan. George Catlan, known for his early paintings of Native Americans, wrote about the Mandan ceremony, in the early nineteenth century, noting that it gives an account of the Great Flood that destroyed nearly everyone. Only one man escaped in a big canoe. The Mandan remembered the willow twig which the bird carried in its beak – and that the great flood covered the earth for forty days.

Catlin wrote that he had found this story among 120 tribes that he had visited.  He also noted that many totem poles were said to have been made “at the time of the great flood.”

Both the Hopi and the Algonquin traditions tell of their ancestors being warned that the Gods would sink the land beneath the sea. After this the “Father of the Tribes” built a “great reed raft” on which he sailed away with his family and many animals.

In addition to these Native American stories, recalled by Frank Joseph, there are hundreds of other stories, from cultures all over the world, with remarkably similar details. In the two very well-known versions – there is the Greek account of the sinking of Atlantis in a Great Flood, which appears to be the same story as the Biblical Great Flood, from which Noah escaped after building the ark along with a pair of every animal. Then from the ark he sent out birds, including a dove, to find land.

From India, in the Hindu version, Manu rescues a tiny fish and raises him. He grows up to be huge and turns out to be Matsya, the fish incarnation of the God Vishnu. Matsya, after having been released into the ocean, returns later to warn his friend Manu of an upcoming flood, and Manu builds an ark to save himself and the seven sages. Instead of saving the animals – he saves the seeds of the earth’s plants.

How shall we explain the fact that this nearly identical story is told all over the world as if it were a true ancient event?

Well, there’s only one simple possibility. That is to consider that it may be a true story.

Graham Hancock along with a whole host of other writers have published dozens of very intriguing books suggesting that this is an account of a true event (or perhaps a series of events). During the time following the last Ice Age, the seas rose – perhaps a hundred meters – with the melting of the ice – thereby creating great floods and destroying an ancient, advanced civilization. The rising of the seas at this time is an accepted scientific fact. A few people survived and were scattered across the earth.

It’s worth looking into. You might start with Graham Hancock’s books.

Please note the correction below, in the comment by Dr. Prasad.

***

© Copyright, Sharon St Joan, 2022

Caught

white goat in shallow focus shot
Photo by Jeswin Thomas on Pexels.com

Caught,

No way out,

The shout

Of children laughing beyond the hill,

The sun

Wrapped up in billowing clouds,

Within the green, wavering willows

There are bowls

Of singing songs

Woven of silver shrouds

Of moonlight,

A thought

Flown

By,

The gongs

Of the ancient temple at the top of the flight

Of stone steps,

No one knows why.

After the fall,

No recall.

No intention.

Only the mystic lands,

Where glide

The magic birds,

Unknown,

Beyond all paths of being

Where stands

Only the Presence of Eternity,

Beyond the misted rings of timeless time, beckoning

Where only the sacred one walks along,

Only the One

Beyond all paths of being

And the herd

Of little bearded goats

That traipses after,

Who play

In the grass on the sands,

By the rolling sea,

They are the jokes of Saturn, Shani,

Who bray

With their offkey

Bleating call

Nearby,

Where the seasongs

Float on the seaweed

Of the ever-turning tide.

© Copyright, Sharon St Joan, 2022