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Dear Kitty. Some blog

This 13 February 2018 video from India is called Ramapithecus: Phylogenetic and Taxonomic status.

From PLOS:

Late Miocene ape maxilla (upper jaw) discovered in western India

Discovery extends the range of ancient apes in the subcontinent

November 14, 2018

An ape maxilla (upper jaw) from the Late Miocene found in the Kutch basin, in western India, significantly extends the southern range of ancient apes in the Indian Peninsula, according to a study published in November 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ansuya Bhandari from the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India, and colleagues.

Apes, or hominoids, are a group of primates from Africa and Southeast Asia that includes the gibbons and the great apes: chimps, orangutans, gorillas, and humans. Ancient ape remains from Miocene deposits in the Siwaliks of India and Pakistan have been key for understanding the evolution of great…

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Spinning

leaf and twig


the geranium’s
color wheel
spun by cold

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Dear Kitty. Some blog

A reconstruction of Mirarce eatoni perched on the horns of the ceratopsian dinosaur Utahceratops gettyi. Image credit: Brian Engh, dontmesswithdinosaurs.comFrom the University of California – Berkeley in the USA:

Rare fossil bird deepens mystery of avian extinctions

Most complete North American enantiornithine fossil was aerodynamic equal of modern birds

November 13, 2018

Summary: Today’s birds descend from a small number of bird species living before the dinosaur extinction. Some of the birds that went extinct, the enantiornithines, were actually more common than and out-competed modern bird ancestors. Analysis of a newly described fossil, the most complete known from the Americas, demonstrates, too, that the enantiornithines were as agile and strong in flight as the ancestors of modern birds. Why, then, did enantiornithines die out and modern birds flourish?

During the late Cretaceous period, more than 65 million years ago, birds belonging to hundreds of different species flitted around the dinosaurs and through the forests as abundantly as they flit about our woods and fields today.

But after

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Exposing the Big Game

Octopuses are known to be intelligent, advanced creatures, able to create their own shelter, change color in an instant and even adapt well to climate change.

In a new study, a group of 33 international scientists suggest these unique traits may have an unearthly origin. They investigated the theory that octopuses may have evolved from life forms that came to earth on ancient comets.

This isn’t a new concept. Scientists have been grappling with the origins of life on our planet for centuries. And this study adds an intriguing look into the theory of panspermia, that suggests the evolution of life on Earth has, and continues to be, influenced by the arrival of organisms from space.

The study has faced some criticism, but the scientists have also supported their claims with well-established research. Let’s take a closer…

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Dear Kitty. Some blog

This 9 October 2014 video says about itself:

World’s oldest cave paintings from 40,000 years ago discovered in Indonesia

Scientists have calculated that ancient cave drawings in Indonesia are at least as old as prehistoric art in Europe, laying to rest the idea that a human creativity was first born on the western continent.

Using uranium decay levels, scientists concluded that the drawings were made 35,000-40,000 years ago, roughly the same period as drawings found in Spain and France.

One Asian handprint is the oldest on record at 39,000-years-old. Archaeologists estimated the age of a dozen stencils of hands in mulberry red and two detailed drawings of an animal described as a “pig-deer“.

The Indonesian cave drawings are part of more 100 pieces of art in Sulawesi, southeast of Borneo.

From Nature today:

Palaeolithic cave art in Borneo

Abstract

Figurative cave paintings from the Indonesian island…

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Bharata Bharati

Destruction of Babri Masjid in January 1992

After a comprehensive analysis of the evidences that had surfaced during the excavation and the discovery of historical artifacts, the Archeological Survey Of India came to the conclusion that there existed a temple beneath the Babri Masjid. – K.K. Muhammed

It was in 1990 that the issue of Ayodhya became hot. Before that, in 1978 itself, as a student of archaeology, I had the opportunity to survey Ayodhya. As a student of School of Archaeology, Delhi, I was a member of the team headed by Prof B.B. Lal, which was carrying out an extensive survey at Ayodhya.

We found that there existed brick foundations, which supported the pillars of a pre-existed temple. No one had viewed such findings as controversial those days. We examined the facts with due sense of history as archaeological experts.

There were temple-pillars embedded on the walls of Babri Masjid. These pillars were made of a…

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Birds, how high do they fly?

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This 6 November 2018 video says about itself:

Bird flight height comparison:

Migratory birds and birds of prey can reach substantial heights while flying. This list gives the highest recorded flights for various species (limited to observations of 4,500 metres/15,000 feet and above).

Here is the list of some of the highest flying birds in the world:

Northern pintail
White stork
Wallcreeper
Hummingbird
Sparrow
Bar-tailed godwit
Siberian crane
Mallard
Andean condor
Bearded vulture
Steppe eagle
Demoiselle crane
Alpine chough
Whooper swan
Bar-headed goose
Common crane
Rüppell’s vulture

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Time and universe

GLOBAL HINDUISM

“Know nature to be Maya and the Ruler of this Maya is the Lord Himself.” — Svetasvatara Upanishad.( 5000 BC )

God lives in Time and Space and moves with Time (both are eternal ). Heavens, Earth, day and night all serve Time and Time controls All . (Rig Veda 1-95-7).

‘That which is above the sky, that which is beneath the earth, that which is between these two, sky and earth that which the people call the past, the present and future, across space is that woven like warp and weft. – Brhadaranyaka Upanisad 5000 BC

The theory of Maya is one of the grand pillars upon which Vedanta rests.

The word origin of MAYA is derived from the Sanskrit roots MA ( not ) and YA ( that ).

The term MAYA is mentioned 72 times in Rigveda written down in Sanskrit in 5000 BC. Maya is mentioned…

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one ID 59266198 © Adriana Maria Leenheer | Dreamstime.com

 

By Sharon St Joan

 

On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 11 pm in Maharashtra, India, a tiger called Avni was shot and killed by the Forest Service, leaving her two ten-month old cubs, who are too young to survive on their own, without their mother. There has been a major outcry against this injustice in the Indian press. For details, you can google “Avni” – beware of numerous fabricated justifications (lies) being given by the authorities.

 

In Utah, in the U.S. (and in other states), hunting native big cats is not illegal. Every year in Utah the number of cougars allowed to be hunted is increased, despite the fact that there is no real data on the actual numbers of cougars left in the wild. This hunting season, the target for cougars has been raised from 581 to 642 – the equivalent of 61 additional, innocent “Avni’s” slated to lose their lives. (Please see the link below.)

 

twoID 39369001 © Belizar | Dreamstime.com

 

A cougar is not a tiger and is not – not yet anyway – endangered. Not being endangered, however, is not a reason to allow the senseless killing of living animals – for the sole purpose of displaying their heads on the living room wall. Both tigers and cougars are astonishing, magnificent animals. And every other animal on earth – from the bright fish in the sea to the squirrels who are gathering their food for winter is a living, sentient being, whose life has worth and value.

 

Connectedness

 

Entirely apart from the consciousness and sentience of each living animal, to whom her life is as precious to her as ours is to us – we, as humans, are all connected to the world of nature.

 

This connectedness is extremely ancient knowledge, still alive in India – and, to some extent, in the west as well. In Hinduism, every God or Goddess is linked to an animal. The Goddess Durga, one of the forms of the wife of the great God Shiva, is also an independent, powerful deity in her own right. She is fierce, a warrior Goddess who fights and defeats evil. Durga and the tiger are inseparable.

 

This ferocity is also the nature of the tiger – powerful and dynamic, a mother who defends and protects her young. Or a male who represents the wild spirit of the forest.

 

The tiger is the essence of the wild – untamable and free.

 

threeID 50336351 © Sonsam | Dreamstime.com

 

Who would want to kill such a magnificent animal?

 

Paleolithic and neolithic people did hunt for survival, but not for sport.

 

Since the beginning of time, animals have been hunted for food by tribal people. For at least 10,000 years Native Americans lived off the land, hunting and fishing, as well as growing whatever vegetables they could. In the sixteenth century, when Europeans arrived on the shores of America, they found a land of unbelievable beauty and magnificence – filled with a vast abundance of wildlife and wild lands which had not been destroyed or diminished – which they promptly set about to demolish. This destruction continues unabated to this day, until there is not much left of the great wilderness that was once here.

 

Europeans, my ancestors and perhaps yours, brought with them a culture of dominance (over other peoples and nature), which is also a culture of alienation from the natural world. It’s a case of “us” and “them,” which proclaims, “I’m a human, and that thing over there, unfortunately, is just an ‘animal’ – just an object to be used for my benefit.”

 

Malevolent intent?

 

We can see this thinking alive and well today in the way that the word “animal” is still being used, endlessly, sometimes to apply to anyone who is simply “other.” The word “animal” is also used for those who demonstrate disgusting or criminal behavior – despite the fact that animals are innocent beings, and no animal behaves, or thinks, like a criminal. The attribute of “viciousness” can logically apply only to humans, because it applies to malevolent intent, which animals simply do not have.

 

It is this malevolent intent which is the problem. Not all humans, thankfully, have this trait. And not all cultures either. It is something gone awry in the history of our race. If one goes far back to the time of the Romans, the Europeans, then pagan tribes, were worshipping trees and nature, just like other early peoples.

 

They had genuine spiritual traditions, really not so different from those of India, which were based on peace and harmony with nature. Not that they were entirely peaceful, they certainly weren’t, but there was an underlying premise of being at one with nature – of being part of one overall earth – of not being alienated or superior to this planet – and there was an absence of the desire to kill nature. (Sadly, western religions seem to have little to do now with their own origins, and they have, in large measure, been taken over by the western view which sees everything as a dichotomy.)

 

Inciting fear

 

Killing a tiger, a cougar, a bear, or a wolf, is, in a way, emblematic of this malevolent intent – this destructive, evil force which has, to some extent, possessed the human race. These great archetypal animals seem to incite fear and to have a magical power within them – some sort of force, a will, which is untamed and untamable. They are hunted for no rational purpose – hunted to near extinction. No one in Utah, or elsewhere in the U.S., is in any reasonable danger of being killed by a cougar. We are in far more danger of being killed by our own cars, while we are driving them, than we are of being harmed by any of these animals.

 

There is something vastly irrational about the destruction that we as humans are inflicting on the earth. We have already destroyed 60% of the animals on the planet. We have turned half of the earth’s land mass into farm land, destroying forests and natural ecosystems.

 

fourID 63152963 © Wonderful Nature | Dreamstime.com

 

With our artificial chemicals pouring into waterways, we are rapidly poisoning the ocean – as well as the air and the land. And, as we know, we are destroying the climate.

 

Since we are dependent on the earth for our survival, there is absolutely nothing sane or rational about these human activities. They are like a suicidal madman waving about a bomb that is about to detonate.

 

Yes, of course, there is an element of greed and self-centeredness in the way humans go about taking over and then obliterating all life on the planet. But this, in itself, is really not a rational explanation for the obsessive level of destruction that is taking place.

 

One might posit that there is some underlying, driving, unconscious force which compels us to behave in this immensely self-destructive way. We seem to want to kill ourselves.

 

Why?

 

This major isolation and alienation from nature which has taken hold of us is propelling us toward a cliff, a bottomless abyss — and seems to predetermine our will as a species, and our actions.

 

Yet, although this is, I am aware, profoundly gloomy, there is something else also, a certain light – which lies in the fact that not all of humanity has always behaved in this self-destructive way.

 

Ancient people saw themselves as part of the earth, as, ultimately being at one with the animals, the trees, the rivers, and all life.  Even today, especially among those cultures and countries not altogether swept up in the falsehoods of the modern worldview, there are remnants and in some cases the reawakening of a true realization that we are the earth and the earth is us. We are all one, intertwined and interrelated.

 

There is, moreover, a dynamic, and growing movement, all over the planet, both east and west, to return to, and go forward with, the knowledge and vision of deep reverence for the world of nature and the sacredness of all life.

 

Looking ahead

 

fiveID 102516960 © Avspream | Dreamstime.com

 

This is the great end battle. Nature, of course – even if it takes several millennia — will recover and will win, in this world or in another. The question that remains is — will we join with nature, protecting her as the earth, our mother, or will we, as a species, self-destruct? We shall see.

 

In the meantime, each of us can open our eyes and our hearts — and live, as best we can, in harmony and peace with the natural world and its numinous, alive, wild presence – encountered in the wonderful, fiery eyes of the tiger and in all of nature.

 

Link to Salt Lake Tribune article about cougar hunting:

https://www.sltrib.com/news/environment/2018/09/15/utah-is-putting-more/

 

 

Photos:

Top photo:ID 59266198 © Adriana Maria Leenheer | Dreamstime.com

Second photo:ID 39369001 © Belizar | Dreamstime.com

Third photo: ID 50336351 © Sonsam | Dreamstime.com

Fourth photo: ID 63152963 © Wonderful Nature | Dreamstime.com

Fifth photo: ID 102516960 © Avspream | Dreamstime.com

 

© Sharon St Joan, 2018

 

 

RASIPURAM KAILASANATHAR TEMPLE

Dream Temples

Rajagopuram of Kailasanathar temple,RasipuramRASIPURAM

Rasipuram is a small ancient town with narrow streets and many small but very old temples. Its historical name was Rajapuram.

It is famous for the ghee that is made here called Rasipuram Nei. It has a rich and wholesome flavor.

The silk sarees that are woven here are beautiful. They are known as Rasipuram Pattuand the silk weaving tradition of this small town goes back many hundreds of years when the silk cloth made here was sent to neighboring countries.

Today in addition to the above, it is well known for the many educational institutions around it.

 Its proximity to the Kolli hills makes it an important stop enroute to the hills.

And it was part of the Kingdom of Valvil Ori.

The featured image is the stone sculpture of King Valvil Ori in the temple.

LEGEND

According to legend the existence of the temple spans four yugas…

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