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Dear Kitty. Some blog

This November 2018 video says about itself:

Meet the Majestic Andean Condor, one of the world’s largest flying bird, considered a sacred animal for the Incas.

Andean condors are massive birds, among the largest in the world that are able to fly. Because they are so heavy (up to 33 pounds), these birds prefer to live in windy áreas, where they can glide on air currents with little effort.

From Swansea University in Wales:

Experts’ high-flying study reveals secrets of soaring birds

New research has revealed when it comes to flying the largest of birds rely on air currents, not flapping to move around

July 14, 2020

New research has revealed when it comes to flying the largest of birds don’t rely on flapping to move around. Instead they make use of air currents to keep them airborne for hours at a time.

The Andean condor — the world’s…

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Dear Kitty. Some blog

This 2019 video is called Hoopoe facts: birds with stinkin’ great accuracy | Animal Fact Files.

This spring, for the first time since a long time ago, a hoopoe couple has nested in the Netherlands: in the Amsterdamse Waterleidingduinen area, in a hollow in a big tree. Five young hoopoes have fledged.

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Dear Kitty. Some blog

This 2017 video from the USA is called Elrathia kingi – Trilobite Fossil.

From the American Museum of Natural History:

Growth rate of common trilobites

July 15, 2020

If you’ve ever held a trilobite fossil, seen one in a classroom, or walked by one in a store, chances are it was Elrathia kingii, one of the most common and well-recognized trilobites, and collected by the hundreds of thousands in western Utah. But despite the popularity of this species, scientists had not determined how it grew — from hatchling to juvenile to adult — until now. New work from the American Museum of Natural History published today in the journal Papers in Palaeontology describes the development and growth rate of Elrathia kingii — only the second such dataset to be compiled for a trilobite — allowing for the first comparison among trilobite species.

“There’s quite a big size range among…

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Waders of Voorne island

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This June 2020 video shows wading birds of Voorne island in the Netherlands. Including ruff, avocet and spotted redshank.

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The Extinction Chronicles

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Paleontologist Gerhard Gierlinski, from Warsaw, Poland, was just trying to get away from it all in the summer of 2002 and enjoy the warm seas and soft sands on the Greek island of Crete with his girlfriend. A researcher at the Polish Geological Institute, he was always ready to take samples of interesting things he spied on vacations, and he traveled with a hammer, a camera and a GPS for just such occasions.

What he discovered along the Mediterranean shores of the town of Trachilos would rock his world and send some researchers who were convinced that humans evolved solely in Africa, into angry denial, and resulted in many of them casting aspersions on his jaw-dropping find.

Gierlinski asked colleagues from Poland, Sweden, Greece, the US and the UK…

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Young avocets on video

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This video is about young avocets in the Crezéepolder nature reserve in the Netherlands.

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RED POWER MEDIA

Protesters against the Dakota Access oil pipeline stand on a burned-out truck near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Nov. 21.(James MacPherson / Associated Press)

FARGO, N.D. — A judge on Monday ordered the Dakota Access pipeline shut down for additional environmental review more than three years after it began pumping oil — handing a victory to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and delivering a blow to U.S. President Donald Trump’s efforts to weaken public health and environmental protections it views as obstacles to businesses.

In a 24-page order, U.S. District Judge James Boasberg in Washington, D.C., wrote that he was “mindful of the disruption” that shutting down the pipeline would cause, but that it must be done within 30 days. Pipeline owner Energy Transfer Partners plans to ask a court to halt the order and will seek an expedited appeal, spokeswoman Vicki Granado said.

The order comes after Boesberg said in…

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The Extinction Chronicles

Consultant neurologist Arvind Chandratheva points out brain damage on a scan
Image captionConsultant neurologist Arvind Chandratheva points out brain damage on a scan

Stroke, delirium, anxiety, confusion, fatigue – the list goes on. If you think Covid-19 is just a respiratory disease, think again.

As each week passes, it is becoming increasingly clear that coronavirus can trigger a huge range of neurological problems.

Several people who’ve contacted me after comparatively mild illness have spoken of the lingering cognitive impact of the disease – problems with their memory, tiredness, staying focused.

But it’s at the more severe end that there is most concern.

Chatting to Paul Mylrea, it’s hard to imagine that he had two massive strokes, both caused by coronavirus infection.

The 64-year-old, who is director of communications at Cambridge University, is eloquent and, despite some lingering weakness on his right side, able-bodied.

He has made one of the…

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This article in Scientific American explains what is currently known about the coronavirus and how it works.

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This 29 June 2020 video says about itself:

Captioned video showing and describing a new soft coral garden habitat discovered deep off the coast of Greenland.

From University College London in England:

Soft coral garden discovered in Greenland’s deep sea

June 29, 2020

A deep-sea soft coral garden habitat has been discovered in Greenlandic waters by scientists from UCL, ZSL and Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, using an innovative and low-cost deep-sea video camera built and deployed by the team.

The soft coral garden, presented in a new Frontiers in Marine Science paper, is the first habitat of this kind to have been identified and assessed in west Greenland waters.

The study has direct implications for the management of economically important deep-sea trawl fisheries, which are immediately adjacent to the habitat. The researchers hope that a 486 km2 area will be recognised as a ‘Vulnerable Marine Ecosystem’ under UN…

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