The answer is giant cookie monsters

gray and black galaxy wallpaper
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

(This is not meant to be taken seriously. But then again, who knows?)

As we all know, the earth revolves around the sun. The sun and our solar system revolve around the Milky Way galaxy, and each complete turn around the galaxy takes about 200,000 years, which is quite a long time. What we commonly acknowledge as our own human history is around 5,000 years, beginning with the start of writing at maybe around 3,000 BCE.

We have no idea what awaits us on the long journey around the Milky Way, and no idea what may have happened on previous revolutions. It’s a bit like early explorers sailing around the globe – where would they encounter choppy seas, where would there be huge waves – or giant squids waiting to attack – or a hot baking sun, unrelenting?  No one knew.

We kind of imagine that stars are stars, and that’s pretty much what’s out there in outer space – just stars, clusters of stars, nebulous clouds, crowded spots and less crowded spots, but really, we haven’t a clue.

Apparently, our sun is currently about halfway out along the spiral arms and seems to be in a less traveled space in between one spiral arm above and one below. So, round and round we go. We move forward as part of the spiral arms of stars that circle around the galaxy.

What if there is a patch where there are unforeseen hazards?  Maybe there are some ultra weird vibrations from a strange kind of star – or a whole bunch of strange stars?  Maybe extra gamma rays or quarks or super strange neutrinos or something that speeds things up or slows things down or, like a ship at sea, is suddenly really, really bumpy, or extra windy (with solar wind), or filled with unpredictable magnetism? Or something that shakes everything up or that spins things round and round? Then what? 

Or what if it’s something that creates effects, but that can’t be seen at all? Like big giant goblins with fiery breath?  Or invisible monster spiders waiting to trap us in spidery webs?  Or wispy, ghosty things that glow in the night? Well, you say, these things don’t exist. Really? Can you prove that they don’t exist?

What if we travel through a really hazardous, uncomfortable patch that lasts a couple of thousand years? What then?

Things have gotten quite uncomfortable lately:  floods and mega-droughts, natural cataclysms (this isn’t, in any way, to deny human-caused climate change, but sometimes there can be more than one cause for an effect). As for how humans are doing, part of our American population might be described as violent and delusional – another part as feeling victimized and a tiny bit self-righteous. (No one will agree with this, because we each see our own viewpoint as the correct one.)

In the meantime, much of the U.S. workforce has either gone on strike or gone AWOL.  It has vanished. No one quite knows where or how, but one can see the consequences – shortages, unexpected and inconvenient. There are not enough people to move merchandise that is bought – so it sits, piled up, unable to get where it is going, unable to reach customers.

Meanwhile, rates of mental ill health are soaring – depression, violent crime, murder.

And then, of course, there’s the pandemic – such an odd virus.

It is almost as if great hordes of giant demon cookie monsters have been lying awake, clustered by the starry roadside, waiting to pounce upon us unsuspecting earthlings just as we sail innocently by, on our 200,000 year-long wheel around the galaxy – casting our health and our civilization into disarray.

I think giant cookie monsters lying in wait is as good an explanation as any. What do you think?

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